1

. ti- 
Player One
Player Two
-ble
8.
-tle
1
9
Player One
Player Two
Three-Syllable Games for grade three and up

9
ath-
ma-
-ic
-mol-
-ic
7
-jes-
ter-
-rif-
7
9
9
1
1
ath-
1
-let-
2
9
1
bu-
These games are for a student who muddles the middles of long words, providing a way to practice detached syllables and gain confidence with words of two or more syllables. Once they have mastered three-letter words, children with reading problems need to read detached syllables if they are to progress beyond second-grade level. The trouble is that they are often bored with decoding detached syllables, but you get their full attention when they are playing this game. In fact, my third graders and fourth graders seem to look forward to this part of the lesson.

The games come in four levels for grades two through five and up. Each level has 18 or 20 games, with nine words of two or three syllables in each game. 

Winning is based on luck and play-by-play decisions that have nothing to do with decoding skill, so the teacher can win half the time. The first two-syllable games are easy enough for second graders, and the three-syllable games require enough strategy to hold the interest of older children.

The manual is thorough, and the games come in ready-to-use packets. Just shuffle in five piles and play. Keep a score sheet. Winning is not dependent on decoding skill.

Level 1 - grade 2 and up - 20 two-syllable games      
Level 2 - grade 3 and up - 10 two-sylable and 10 three-syllable games
Level 3 - grade 4 and up - 4 two-syllable and 14 three-syllable games Level 4 - grade 5 and up - 4 two-syllable and 14 three-syllable games

76 Parallel games in the same four levels contain nonsense words for students whose word attack lags behind their memorized vocabulary. Each game contains one real word, which gets two points. These are the same words as the words in the Dividing Pages.

Students who are bewildered by accented and unaccented syllables can figure out their words without having to use accent marks. For example,
the a in majestic is colored pink to show that it sounds like
a schwa, a short u, or a short anything--your choice.

The cards are age-neutral in format and can be used with adult basic-literacy students, who can use the cards without playing the games. All the syllables in the nonsense words are useful syllables that come from real words, which are listed in the manual.

THE DIVIDING PAGES FOR PRACTICING THE RULES OF SYLLABICATION.

37 large-print pages of words come with the games. Each page has 16 nonsense words for practicing the most useful rules of syllabication. Children enjoy putting fences between the syllables with colored pens and take pride in becoming automatic with the rules, especially when they know they don't have to read the words they have just divided. (The games take care of the reading.) I have to add that some more advanced pupils are able to read the words off
the page after dividing them, but they don't do this until they have first done all the pages without reading them.

Because these are nonsense words, students can't possibly be familiar with them and are forced to use the rules. The manual makes the rules easy to teach, and the games take care of words that don't follow the rules.

This way the business of dividing words and reading them is broken into two separate processes. Later, your students can kick away the training wheels and manage both at once--as advanced readers do without even thinking about it.

These pages can be photocopied for each lesson, or they can be placed in plastic page protectors and used with colored Vis a Vis pens (which children especially enjoy).

Two-syllable games for grade two and up.
The player on the left just drew an 8 card. Now the players can trade.
stum-.
8
THE TRADING GAME - SYLLABICATION
buglemajesticathleticterrifictitlestumblebuglemajesticterrifictitlestumblebuglemajesticathleticterrific
HOME
Click here to see the COLOR CODE
Click here to see SPELLING WITH CLUES
Copyright 1999Ann Turner
Click LESSON PLAN to see how to use the Trading Game
            in a program with an at-risk second grader.
I can send the manual and the Dividing Pages by means of e-mail attachments (the way I do everything else), but it would be better to send the games themselves through the mail because there are so many little cards for you to print and cut out. There are 720 cards in Level Two and 900 cards in each of the other three levels, and I have a number of games already printed out. If you send me your address, I'll send them to you. I could use  help with the postage, but I won't insist if you want to try them out first. All I can say is that these games have made teaching children to read longer words so much more fun than forcing detached syllables down the throats of reluctant pupils.